Executive Education

Family Firms in the long run: The interplay between emotions and history.

May 11-12 2017. Lille & Paris, France

Family owned and managed businesses play a very central role in the world’s economy. What makes them intriguing is the interconnectedness of the family and the business on the long-run. As such, they offer a fertile ground for exploring the history of the family in addition to the history of the business. Up to date however, scarce studies and documented practices exist on the mutual influence between emotions and history and their impact on family business sustainability.

This conference stands as a promising meeting point between business historians, family business members, scholars and practitioners to address these gaps in knowledge.

 

A Conference to share, learn and exchange about emotions in family business.

The conference aims at strengthening and stimulating the historians’ analytical and practical efforts by integrating theories and insights from family business management and history studies and combining them with the knowledge based on the experiences of family business owners, managers, and practitioners. As such, it will provide an exchange platform to reflect and gain a deeper understanding on the complex nature of the family and the business as they connect with emotional dimensions over time.

What can we learn about family firms through emotions and history?

Among relevant issues at the intersection of emotions and history, the conference will explore over two days:

  • The process of historical narratives and related emotions
  • The strategic use of family business history
  • The family business in the lens of emotions and history

 

The Academic Conference Day - May 11th, EDHEC Lille

The Academic day aims at research presentations that lay down the state of the art on the topic and build basis for advancing research in the fields of business history and family business.

 
The Family Business Day - May 12th, EDHEC Paris

The Family Business day offers a unique opportunity for family business members to interact with other family business members and practitioners but moreover with historians and family business scholars from around the world about the place of emotions within the practices of historical narratives and their impact on sustainability. Presentations will be followed by practical workshops insmall groups.

Organization Committee:
Fabian Bernhard, Ludovic Cailluet et Rania Labaki (EDHEC Business School, EDHEC Family Business Centre - EFBC)

 

Register now!

EDHEC Family Business Center
fbc-conference@edhec.edu
Phone :+ 33 1 53 32 76 66

EDHEC Business School is pleased to announce Emmanuel Métais’s appointment as the new Dean of EDHEC Business School. He succeeds Olivier Oger who has led the School since 1988. He will assume this role on 1 July, bearing in mind that Olivier Oger will be working with him until the end of the year.

In accordance with the recruitment process announced a few months ago, the Selection Committee* set up to choose the new Dean examined both internal and external candidates, based on research conducted by the global executive search firm Korn Ferry International. After completing its remit, the Selection Committee recommended Emmanuel Métais to the Board of Governors, which unanimously approved this choice during its meeting on 13 March.

Emmanuel Métais, 48, has worked for EDHEC Business School for over 20 years and been Associate Dean for Graduate Studies since 2015. Emmanuel holds a PhD in Strategic Management and is a Professor of Strategy. His main research themes focus on corporate strategy and particularly on disruptive strategies and M&A performance. He has published numerous articles and book chapters relating to these themes in French and international academic journals.

Emmanuel Métais ran EDHEC Business School’s Strategy & Management Department between 1997 and 2005. He has overseen several major transformations within the School: after having supervised EDHEC’s first AACSB accreditation in 2002, he managed the School’s portfolio of International post-graduate programmes between 2005 and 2008 and was responsible for the EDHEC Global MBA between 2006 and 2015. In this last position, he accelerated the development of this strategic programme, during a period in which it successively entered the rankings of The Economist (now 24th worldwide and 3rd in France) and The Financial Times (74th worldwide and 3rd in France in 2017).

“I am both honoured and delighted to be named as Olivier Oger's successor as Dean of EDHEC Business School. I am particularly attached to the School, its teams, its students and graduates. And I believe in our values of innovation, impact and engagement. I plan to build on our School’s distinctive strengths - our taste for entrepreneurship and for questioning the established way of doing things, our world-class expertise, our highly-engaged international alumni network - in order to start work on my project quickly with the ultimate goal of making EDHEC one of the top 10 European business schools”, comments Emmanuel Métais.

“EDHEC is now identified in Europe as one the most dynamic international schools that make a difference. I am delighted with the choice of Emmanuel Métais as the new Dean. The combination of his career experience, the projects he has led at EDHEC, his international experience and his solid academic profile makes him the ideal choice to further EDHEC’s ambitious development programme. Our strategy that seeks to “make an impact” in the business, research and entrepreneurship fields and to leverage pedagogical innovation, will be continued and accelerated”, declares Bruno de Pampelonne, Chairman of the Board of Governors, EDHEC Business School.

 

* Membership of the Selection Committee for the new Dean :
- Christine Chaissou, Head of Human Resources – EDHEC Business School ;
- Emmanuelle Guilbart, Member of the Steering Committee of the Board of Governors, President of EDHEC Alumni, Joint CEO – ABOUT PREMIUM CONTENT ;
- Thérèse Lebrun, Member of the Steering Committee of the Board of Governors, Deputy Vice‐Chancellor – CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY OF LILLE ;
- Thierry Marraud, Vice‐Chairman of the Board of Governors, Various company directorships, consultant ;
- Franck Moison, Chairman of the EDHEC International Advisory Board, Vice‐Chairman, Colgate‐Palmolive Company, USA ;
- Vincent Montagne, Chairman of the EDHEC Ethics Board, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Media Participations ;
- Olivier Oger, Dean – EDHEC Business School ;
- Bruno de Pampelonne, Chairman of the Board of Governors, Chairman ‐ TIKEHAU IM ;
- Richard Simonin, Various company directorships.

Anne Bouverot is the Chairman and CEO of Morpho, the 2 Billion Euro revenue subsidiary of Safran. In front of the EDHEC Executive MBA participants and Alumni, Anne Bouverot spoke about values-based leadership and explained alumni about how to find purpose in their lives.

“I have always pretty much had international responsibilities” tells us Anne Bouverot as a short introduction, influenced by her French father and Canadian mother. After scientific studies, she gets a PhD in artificial intelligence and telecom engineering. She is now the President and CEO of Morpho, in process of selling by Safran. “It is a particularly strong time of change and that is one of the things that I have to adjust and manage as a CEO and as a leader “

In order to speak about leadership, Anne Bouverot tackles few important topics to keep in mind for a manager. The first key word is purpose: “I am a big believer in purpose. I have been working with the concept of purpose for the last 6 years and I found it very useful.” During her former job at GSMA, an international organization based in the UK, she saw the benefits of a formal purpose exercise: “when I arrived people didn’t really know what they stood for, there was a lack of sense of belonging and joint objectives, a lack of membership feeling”. The board felt that the organization wasn’t working on behalf of the members and they decided to launch a purpose exercise, with the purpose “connecting everyone and everything to a better future”. “That was useful in getting people to relate to why their job was important”. At Morpho she also fostered a purpose experience with the motto “making life safer and easier in a connected world and to trusted identities”. According to her, “conducting the exercise with your team is very powerful and getting something that people can relate to is very important”.

"You have a part about saying no” declares Anne Bouverot in a second time. With examples of career defining moment for her, she stresses on the signification to prove a point: “it is important to fight for what you think is right, it is important to listen to the people who will make the decision and understand where they come from."

The third key idea for a leader is helping your team: “when you are in a management position of course you can give people orders, you can give objectives you can tell them not to do something or to do other things. You have a number of powers over them and I also strongly believe that you have a number of responsibilities, from an ethical perspective but also in order to help them to do a better job.”

As a manager and as a leader it is important to spend a lot of time thinking about how you can help your team or how you can help them to concentrate on doing their jobs. It is also the role of a manager to wonder whether people in the team are in the best possible role, depending on where they stand in their career. Finally a leader isolates the team a bit from the stress coming from above and from customers, he or she decides how to communicate some of it and adjust it. “If you do that you gain the fact that it helps you to do a better job and helps you to gain the respect of your team.”

Authenticity is another strong point: “I have always been a strong believer in authenticity, speaking the truth to people. One of the things I have learnt more recently is about being authentic about your weaknesses and things you don’t do perfectly.”

As a conclusion Anne Bouverot reminds us the importance of dreams. “We speak about jobs and careers but in the end, it is about life, it is about what you really want to do.” Dreams are important, especially during periods of transition, asking yourself what do you like doing. Anne Bouverot concludes her intervention with the words of Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, President of Liberia and the Nobel Peace Prize for 2011:’If your dreams do not scare you they are not big enough’ - I encourage you to have big dreams!”

EDHEC Business School was recognized by AACSB International for its submission "The Teaching Factory ", which presented how it co-develops classes with corporate partners for some 2,000 students who work with managers on real cases, yet can count on faculty for guidance as needed. The Teaching Factory was highlighted among the 35 best innovations unveiled at AACSB’s 2017 Deans Conference. A total of 315 submissions were received across 33 countries for the second annual Innovations That Inspire initiative, which recognizes institutions serving as champions of change in the business education landscape.

 

3 emblematic modules from the Teaching Factory:

 

EDHEC Open Innovation

• 2 day Innovation Lab

• 24 firms

• 75 managers

• 20 coachs and professors

• 750 students (600 from EDHEC & 150 from nearby Centrale Lille engineering school)

NéGO! Challenge

• 15 firms

• 680 pre-master level students

• 2 day workshop simulations in negotiation techniques

The Explora Certificate

• 9 corporate partners

• 4 start-ups

• 60 MSc students working in teams

• 4-month, fast-track, part-time, disruptive digital training

 

The Teaching Factory is helping EDHEC to instill a learning-by-doing approach across its portfolio. Students acquire skills, techniques and behaviors through their experience of solving business problems for practicing managers. It ensures that they become proactively engaged in their own training. Their enhanced motivation comes from learning in an entertaining way, through competing against one another and in tackling challenges addressing real business problems that The Factory’s corporate partners have asked them to solve. Additionally, being team-based, these diverse learning modules are highly interactive, because students must not only work together and with managers, but also in close contact with their professors.

Each learning module offers an exceptional opportunity for corporate partners to forge closer ties with their student target audiences and develop their employer brands. These privileged vantage points for observing students at work can be highly beneficial for successful graduate recruitment. Lastly, partners gain first-hand insight from the views and recommendations of these new-generation, multicultural student cohorts about the topics on which a module focuses.

"We are very proud to be recognized by AACSB International for our innovative approach. We have developed The Teaching Factory to meet the demands and new expectations of corporates and students and to be on the cutting edge of innovation in a fast-changing world" commented Anne Guillon, Director of Corporate Relations and Partnerships at EDHEC Business School, who is both one of the project’s originators and its current pilot.

EDHEC Business School joins the exclusive group of the Financial Times’ Top 15 European Business Schools this year at 14th place. The School has gained 11 places since last year, the most impressive improvement found in the rankings.

“This Financial Times ranking yet again confirms EDHEC as one of France’s Top 3 business schools. We are very proud of our School’s progress and increasingly international standing. Its status as one of the world’s leading international business schools is further reinforced by this entry into the Top 15 in Europe, explains Olivier Oger, Dean of EDHEC Business School. Young students or business executives who decide to study at EDHEC today will have chosen to engage in demanding and ambitious training programmes. This will ensure that tomorrow they can make a positive impact on economic affairs and drive value-creation for their businesses.”

This result confirms the international recognition earned by EDHEC in the latest rankings

Master programmes rankings :

  • 2016 Financial Times Masters in Management :
    • EDHEC Master in Management: No.15 worldwide (No.18 in 2015) and No.4 in France, coming after HEC, ESSEC and ESCP
  • 2016 Financial Times MSc in Finance :
    • EDHEC MSc in Financial Markets: No.4 worldwide (No.8 in 2015)

MBA programmes rankings :

  • 2016 Financial Times MBA and Executive MBA :
    • EDHEC Global MBA : No.84 worldwide and No.3 in France
    • EDHEC Executive MBA : joined the Top 50 in Europe as No.48
  • 2016 The Economist MBA :
    • EDHEC Global MBA : No.24 worldwide and No.3 in France (up 20 places in 2 years)

“Make an impact on careers”

This rapid progress also illustrates the successful impact the School makes on its graduates’ careers. Data on the nature of their jobs and the salaries they command are major elements for calculating the rankings. EDHEC’s 14th place is further proof for businesses and senior executives of the excellence of our training programmes.

“This ranking showcases the spectacular progress made by EDHEC Business School without losing any of its identity or originality. EDHEC now offers new generations of managers and entrepreneurs fabulous opportunities to connect, learn new skills, take on challenges and develop their leadership skills.”
adds Franck Moison (EDHEC 1975), Vice-Chairman Colgate-Palmolive, EDHEC International Advisory Board Chairman.

Discover the FT ranking here